Posted in Bullying, Food, Mental Health, Weight

Telling someone to “just eat” doesn’t help, neither does telling someone “just don’t eat as much”…

This week is National Eating Disorders Awareness week.

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(click on image to enlarge)

I wanted to take a moment to once again to remind everyone that anyone can have an eating disorder, no matter what their size or gender. I want to remind you that that “overweight” person that you just judged for having the audacity to eat in public may not have the sort of eating disorder that you think they do. Just because someone might be “overweight” doesn’t mean that they eat too much. When I tell you that I have a history of anorexia and, based on my appearance now, you automatically assume that I must be recovered now, or worse decide that I must never have really had any issues with anorexia in the first place, you are wrong. Yes, I might be “recovered” enough that I now eat something  everyday. My dietary habits might be pretty close to “normal” most of the time now. But that doesn’t mean that I don’t still have times where I do not eat enough. That I don’t have times where I ignore my body when it tells me that I need food. Because I feel that I know better than my body, that I have already had “enough” food that day and therefore my body is just going to have to deal with being hungry. Or better yet, learn to not be hungry. Because what society tells you when you are “overweight” is that all you need to do is “not eat as much” and you will then become thin and therefore acceptable. And if you are “overweight”, according to society, you shouldn’t need as much food anyway.

But what society tells you happens to be lies.


What most people don’t realize is that if you are eating, but not eating enough, your body thinks that you do not have enough food available to you and prepares for famine. It stores up extra fat. So the truly ironic thing about my eating disordered behaviors is that even though I am restricting how much I eat in order to try to lose weight, or at least not gain weight, those behaviors are probably part of the reason why I am “overweight”. And even though I know that, I still can’t seem to completely drop them. I am doing better, but I am not recovered. We all need to learn to stop judging each other based on appearance.

Really, we all need to learn to stop judging each other period. 

None of us truly knows what someone else is going through. If we could all learn to approach others from a place of love and support, this world could be a much better place.

You are all beautiful and you are all enough.

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4 thoughts on “Telling someone to “just eat” doesn’t help, neither does telling someone “just don’t eat as much”…

  1. “…you automatically assume that I must be recovered now, or worse decide that I must never have really had any issues with anorexia in the first place…”

    This, 100 times over. I went from one disorder right into another, so people think I am “cured”, wasn’t really “that sick”, or think it is a joke now at my current weight to have a “problem”. And yes, you can hear the quote marks around the words when they say them.

    As always, thanks for sharing 🙂

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    1. I’m glad to know that I’m not the only one who can hear those quote marks around those words when people say them. It really is such a relief to realize that you are not the only one going through something.
      You’re welcome. It’s nice to know that people appreciate what I have to say. 🙂

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